Open Door Law update: MCCSC sí, state legislation no

Let’s give credit to the Monroe County Community School Corp. board for doing the right thing and complying with the Indiana Open Door Law, no matter how reluctantly.

At a public meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday (Jan. 4), the school board will consider a proposal from the corporation’s principals and directors of elementary and secondary education to serve as interim MCCSC leaders while the board searches for a new superintendent. Then the board will meet again at 5 p.m. Thursday to appoint an interim superintendent.

The board has been through this movie before. The problem is, it apparently discussed and decided to reject the team leadership proposal in a closed-door executive session, on Dec. 7. It then voted Dec. 14 to appoint Tim Hyland interim superintendent.

Bloomington resident Eric Knox questioned whether the Dec. 7 executive session was appropriate in a complaint with the Indiana Public Access Counselor. When the counselor said the Open Door Law didn’t allow for such a discussion to take place in secret, Knox threatened legal action.

The school board, in a statement explaining the do-over, claims it “followed proper procedures” and blames the necessity for this week’s meetings on “a private citizen,” i.e., Knox. But as the Bloomington Herald-Times editorialized, “It’s time to shine a light on the discussion, the disagreements, the persuasions, the consensus being built. It’s time to operate in the open.”

While we’re on the subject of the Open Door Law, here’s a really bad idea that has been proposed for the 2011 session of the state legislature: State Sen. Ron Alting, R-Lafayette, has introduced legislation that would water down the law to let school boards discuss proposals for school consolidation in executive sessions.

There’s probably no topic that has a more disruptive impact on students and parents – and hence, is more controversial – than school consolidation. That’s all the more reason that consolidation should be discussed in public, not behind closed doors.

The legislation has been assigned to the Senate Committee on Local Government. Let’s hope Sen. Connie Lawson, D-Danville, the smart and sensible senator who chairs the committee, will decide there are better issues to spend time on this session.