It’s about time

Students in the Monroe County Community School Corp. will spend considerably more time in school starting next year. Does that mean they’ll learn more? It’s a reasonable question. And the obvious answer is: It depends on the schools and how they make use of the additional time?

Jennifer Davis, president of the National Center on Time and Learning, which helps schools implement expanded learning time initiatives, said as much in a recent interview with Education Week.

“We find that of the schools that transition from a traditional schedule to an expanded schedule, the most successful are those that carefully create a new school plan and schedule that better addresses the needs of students and teachers,” Davis said. “They step back and ask themselves ‘What do our children need to succeed and how do we create a schedule that best meets those needs?’”

In the MCCSC, the longer school day is tied to the implementation of Professional Learning Communities, which very much involves asking what students need to learn and what needs to happen for them to succeed. The PLC process can identify opportunities for effective use of remediation and enrichment, which can take time.

In the elementary schools, another factor is making room for the 90 minutes of daily reading instruction — 90 minutes of uninterrupted daily reading instruction in grades K-3 — required by a new state reading rule.

The MCCSC isn’t alone in wrestling with time. Education Week has had several recent articles on the topic, including coverage of a two-day forum in Washington, D.C., on “Reimagining the School Day.”

Isabel Owen of the Center for American Progress addressed the issue Continue reading

The MCCSC referendum funding: An argument for doing what’s best for students

Someone claimed in the Bloomington Herald-Times that no one has come forward to say he or she voted for the Monroe County Community School Corp. referendum just so the school board could decide how to spend the money, or words to that effect.

Well, I cast one of the 18,701 votes in favor of the referendum. I urged my friends to vote for the referendum. I wrote on this blog that people should support it. I even stood in the cold on Election Day and told strangers they should vote to raise their taxes, even though some of them probably couldn’t afford a tax increase.

Why? Speaking only for myself, I wanted to restore lost funding so the MCCSC would have a better chance at meeting the needs of all of its students. I was encouraged when I heard Superintendent J.T. Coopman and board members say – on multiple occasions – that the referendum would support early-literacy and drop-out prevention programs. But I didn’t take that as a promise.

I assumed decisions about spending the money would be made in the same way that important school budget decisions should always be made: by a democratically elected school board in a public, transparent process that includes honest discussion and a free exchange of ideas and opinions. I hoped board members would respect the advice of MCCSC administrators and listen with an open mind to teachers, students, parents and citizens before making up their minds. Continue reading

Referendum spending a challenge and opportunity for MCCSC

Some initial thoughts on the Monroe County Community School Corp. budget committee recommendations on how to use $7.5 million a year from the recent property-tax referendum.

1 — This is an opportunity for the school board to get the process right. That means having all its discussions in public, however difficult and messy they may be.

The board shouldn’t hash this out behind closed doors on the rationale that it involves collective bargaining strategy. It is doing the right thing by getting input from parents, teachers and the public. It should listen to what people have to say, then do what’s best for students and the community and clearly explain the rationale.

2 – The budget committee report says improving student performance is its No. 1 priority. While acknowledging the central role of teachers, it calls for spending money in a way that will “provide the most meaningful benefit for our students and … reflect an honest assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of our school corporation.”

“If enhancing student performance isn’t our primary goal, then I think we’ve got a problem in this school corporation,” said MCCSC Comptroller and committee member Tim Thrasher. It’s hard to argue with that.

3 – The committee gets style points its “three Rs” approach: restore positions and programs that were cut, replenish the district’s operating balance, and reform instruction.

Best of all is using reform to describe investing in programs and personnel aimed at making sure young children learn to read and older students don’t fall through the cracks – reclaiming a term that has come to refer to charter schools, vouchers, teacher merit pay and union-busting.

Open Door Law update: MCCSC sí, state legislation no

Let’s give credit to the Monroe County Community School Corp. board for doing the right thing and complying with the Indiana Open Door Law, no matter how reluctantly.

At a public meeting at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday (Jan. 4), the school board will consider a proposal from the corporation’s principals and directors of elementary and secondary education to serve as interim MCCSC leaders while the board searches for a new superintendent. Then the board will meet again at 5 p.m. Thursday to appoint an interim superintendent.

The board has been through this movie before. The problem is, it apparently discussed and decided to reject the team leadership proposal in a closed-door executive session, on Dec. 7. It then voted Dec. 14 to appoint Tim Hyland interim superintendent.

Bloomington resident Eric Knox questioned whether the Dec. 7 executive session was appropriate in a complaint with the Indiana Public Access Counselor. When the counselor said the Open Door Law didn’t allow for such a discussion to take place in secret, Knox threatened legal action.

The school board, in a statement explaining the do-over, claims it “followed proper procedures” and blames the necessity for this week’s meetings on “a private citizen,” i.e., Knox. But as the Bloomington Herald-Times editorialized, “It’s time to shine a light on the discussion, the disagreements, the persuasions, the consensus being built. It’s time to operate in the open.”

While we’re on the subject of the Open Door Law, here’s a really bad idea that has been proposed for the 2011 session of the state legislature: State Sen. Ron Alting, R-Lafayette, has introduced legislation that would water down the law to let school boards discuss proposals for school consolidation in executive sessions.

There’s probably no topic that has a more disruptive impact on students and parents – and hence, is more controversial – than school consolidation. That’s all the more reason that consolidation should be discussed in public, not behind closed doors.

The legislation has been assigned to the Senate Committee on Local Government. Let’s hope Sen. Connie Lawson, D-Danville, the smart and sensible senator who chairs the committee, will decide there are better issues to spend time on this session.

More Open Door Law problems for MCCSC board

Did the Monroe County Community School Corp. board violate with the Indiana Open Door Law by discussing a leadership team proposal in a Dec. 7 executive session?

Both the state public access counselor and the school board’s own attorney, writing in response to a complaint from Support Our Schools organizer Eric Knox, seem to have said that such a discussion is not allowed. Yet the board apparently not only discussed the proposal but decided to reject it and to come up with an alternative in the closed-door meeting.

And that’s why the board will be having yet another executive session on Tuesday, its sixth in the past month – this one to discuss strategy with respect to a threatened lawsuit over violation of the Open Door Law.

To recap, the proposal made in November by the MCCSC’s instructional leadership team called for having the 25-member team, made up of school principals and the directors of elementary and secondary education, serve as interim leader while the board seeks a replacement for Superintendent J.T. Coopman, who is retiring.

After getting feedback from the school board, the instructional leadership team revised its proposal, suggesting that a three-person executive serve as interim leader with support from the other 22 team members.

The school board never discussed the revised proposal in public. But board president Jeannine Butler told the team on Dec. 14 that the board declined the offer. Instead, it appointed retired school administrator Tim Hyland to serve as MCCSC interim superintendent, a position he previously held in 2008-09. Butler said the board would establish a committee of four principals to advise him.

Questioned about the decision, Butler said she believed the board had decided to reject the leadership team proposal during the executive session on Dec. 7. Continue reading

Why making adequate yearly progress can be a big deal

The Bloomington Herald-Times asked this question in a recent editorial: “With a vast majority of the state’s school corporations able to make AYP year after year — 94 percent made it this year — how is it that Monroe County’s public school systems aren’t?”

One part of the answer is that it’s a lot harder for large, diverse school corporations to make AYP (adequate yearly progress) under the No Child Left Behind Act than for small, homogenous school districts. Why? Because bigger and more diverse corporations have more opportunities to fail.

And compared to most Indiana school districts, the Monroe County Community School Corp. is big and diverse. It ranks No. 21 in enrollment among nearly 300 public school districts in the state.

Monroe County’s other public school district, Richland-Bean Blossom, did in fact make AYP year after year, for five years in a row, before missing it this year. The MCCSC made AYP this year after failing to do so for two previous years.

School corporations, in order to make AYP, must do two things: 1) meet required standards on state standardized tests for all students, or “overall AYP”; and 2) meet testing standards in at least one grade span – elementary, middle or high school – for each subgroup of students, such as special-needs students, minorities and those from low-income families.

But here’s the catch. Continue reading

‘Focused search’ likely for MCCSC superintendent

Look for the Monroe County Community School Corp. board to conduct a quick, focused search for a new superintendent to succeed J.T. Coopman, who is retiring Dec. 31.

Ron Barnes, a search consultant and retired Indiana University professor who is advising the board, suggested a focused search at a school board work session Wednesday. And board members clearly favored the idea.

Barnes said it might be possible to name a superintendent by February or March, with the idea that he or she would transition into the job by summer. “I would say ready, fire, aim – get it going,” he said.

Under the scenario he laid out, the school board would appoint a committee of six or so members to advise it on the search. Barnes said the panel might include IU School of Education faculty, business and civic leaders, and volunteers who helped lead a recent school funding referendum campaign.

Committee members would use their networks of contacts to identify, contact and recruit prospects. The board would screen them and conduct initial interviews. Although the job has turned over frequently in recent years, Barnes said it should attract good candidates.

“We’re bringing in leadership to a school corporation where great teachers are doing their job every day and great administrators are doing their job every day,” he said.

Focus groups and possibly a public meeting could provide input on what qualities the next superintendent should possess. When three or so finalists are chosen, the board could make their names public and have them speak at public forums, as it did when it hired Coopman in 2008.

Barnes said it’s likely to take a compensation package of $200,000 a year or more to lure a leader with the experience and ability needed. “I’ve lived in this community for 16 years now, and this job can’t have training wheels on it,” he said.

He said the board may save about $40,000 by doing a focused search by itself with help from a citizen committee, rather than hiring a consulting firm to do a nationwide search.

School board faces tough call on interim leadership proposal

The Monroe County Community School Corp. board is in a tough spot. It needs to decide – quickly – whether to accept or reject a proposal by the corporation’s 25-member instructional leadership team to serve together as interim leader of the district while the board searches for a new superintendent.

The alternative is to appoint an interim superintendent until a long-term successor is chosen for Superintendent J.T. Coopman, who will retire Dec. 31.

The school board will discuss the team leadership idea Tuesday in a closed executive session. The next regular public meeting at which it could vote on the decision is Dec. 14.

The MCCSC instructional team, consisting of principals and the directors of elementary and secondary education, made the case for its leadership proposal last week at a school board work session. The unity and enthusiasm shown by the group were remarkable – all 25 people spoke and all endorsed the proposal. Members attributed the idea and their shared sense of purpose to the Professional Learning Communities model that the MCCSC adopted under Coopman.

School board members said they fully support Professional Learning Communities, but several expressed skepticism about leadership by committee. If they reject the proposal, it may be a challenge to do so in a way that doesn’t appear to be a slap at the PLC process.

The Nov. 30 school board work session was recorded by Monroe County’s Community Access Television Services. It will be re-broadcast several times this week on local cable channel 14. It can also be viewed online at catstv.net. It makes for surprisingly compelling TV.

In fact, anyone with strong interest in local schools and about five hours to spare could pair the work session with Saturday’s Support Our Schools forum, also being shown by CATS. The forum included insightful comments by former MCCSC officials, current city and county officials, parents and community members on a wide range of issues related to local schools.

More executive sessions posted for MCCSC board

The Monroe County Community School Corp. board has scheduled not one, not two, but three closed executive sessions next week:

– Monday at 9 a.m. for new board members to be trained in their role as public officials by a trainer from the Indiana School Boards Association.
— Tuesday at 5 p.m. to receive information about or interview candidates for employment.
— Wednesday at 5 p.m. to consider a job performance evaluation of an employee.

The board will also have a work session at 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at the MCCSC Administration Building to discuss the process for selecting a superintendent to succeed J.T. Coopman, who is retiring at the end of this year. Work sessions are open to the public, but there’s typically no public comment.

At Tuesday’s executive session, the board will apparently “receive information about” options for temporary leadership until a superintendent is hired: i.e., whether to name an interim superintendent or to accept a proposal for an executive council of MCCSC administrators to take charge.

“There will be no vote (Tuesday) as it is illegal to vote in exec. meetings,” board president Jeannine Butler said by e-mail.

Executive session is to train new school board members

The Dec. 6 executive session of the Monroe County Community School Corp. board is to provide training for board members-elect Martha Street and Kelly Smith, according to member Sue Wanzer.

That’s a legitimate reason for a closed meeting under the Indiana Open Door Law, which allows executive sessions “to train school board members with an outside consultant about the performance of the role of the members as public officials.”

Wanzer said the board will meet with a trainer from the Indiana School Boards Association, who will help get Street and Smith up to speed on what’s involved in serving on a school board. They were elected to the board in November and take office in January. Keith Klein joined the board a year ago and arguably also qualifies as a new member due for training.

School Matters questioned the closed meeting last week in light of concern about secrecy in the early stages of a search for a new MCCSC superintendent.

There’s no question that it’s legal for the board to have an executive session for the training of new members. Whether the entire board needs to be present for such training is another matter. Also, there’s nothing that says the meeting has to be closed – and one could argue that the community would also benefit from hearing the ISBA’s take on the proper role of board members.